Monday, November 14, 2022

Laura Ford's Sounds Like Love Blog Tour with a Spotlight and Giveaway

 

I am so excited to have Laura Ford here at Paranormal and Romantic Suspense Reviews with a Spotlight and Giveaway.

Thanks Laura and Great Escapes Virtual Book Tours for allowing me to join your Sounds Like Love Blog Tour!

Please take it away, Laura!

 

 

Sounds Like Love
Young Adult Fiction / Coming of Age
Setting – United Kingdom
FriesenPress (July 29, 2021)
Reading age ‏ : ‎ 12 – 17 years
Hardcover ‏ : ‎ 150 pages
ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 1525592998
ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-1525592997
Paperback ‏ : ‎ 150 pages
ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 152559298X
ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-1525592980
Digital ASIN ‏ : ‎ B09BTLYBWT



Wendy is a bright spark who wants to find love and travel the world, but she questions how her dreams can become a reality as her world changes around her.

When Wendy arrives at her beloved grandmother’s house to collect a box of keepsakes, she picks up more than she bargained for – a green-eyed tabby cat with amazing qualities. This is just the start of a high-speed adventure, leading Wendy towards bright new horizons… if only she’ll give the cat a chance… 

About Laura Ford

 

Laura Ford writes novels, short stories, and poems across a wide range of human and animal experiences. As Laura is an avid cat lover, a number of special felines tend to find their way into Laura’s stories as well.

Laura graduated with an honours degree in British law while also writing fiction in parallel. Now based in California with her husband and two beguiling Siamese cats, Laura most enjoys using her imagination and memories to paint vivid stories. An avid traveler and seeker, Laura is always exploring new concepts for more stories to come.

Author Link – https://www.soundslikelovebook.com/

Purchase Links – Amazon – Barnes & Noble I tunes Google Play Store Direct from the publisher

Giveaway

http://www.rafflecopter.com/rafl/display/028877921445 

Please follow the rest of the tour here, thanks:

https://www.escapewithdollycas.com/great-escapes-virtual-book-tours/books-currently-on-tour/sounds-like-love-by-laura-ford

 

Wednesday, November 2, 2022

Pan de Muertos (Mexican Bread of the Dead)

 


Ingredients 

1/4 cup margarine
1/4 cup milk
1/4 cup warm water (110 degrees F/45 degrees C)
3 cups all-purpose flour
1 1/4 teaspoons active dry yeast
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons anise seed
1/4 cup white sugar
2 eggs, beaten
2 teaspoons orange zest
1/4 cup white sugar
1/4 cup orange juice
1 tablespoon orange zest
2 tablespoons white sugar

Directions

1.  Heat the milk and the butter together in a medium saucepan, until the butter melts. Remove from the heat and add them warm water. The mixture should be around 110 degrees F (43 degrees C).

2.  In a large bowl combine 1 cup of the flour, yeast, salt, anise seed and 1/4 cup of the sugar. Beat in the warm milk mixture then add the eggs and orange zest and beat until well combined. Stir in 1/2 cup of flour and continue adding more flour until the dough is soft.

3.  Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead until smooth and elastic.

4.  Place the dough into a lightly greased bowl cover with plastic wrap and let rise in a warm place until doubled in size. This will take about 1 to 2 hours. Punch the dough down and shape it into a large round loaf with a round knob on top. Place dough onto a baking sheet, loosely cover with plastic wrap and let rise in a warm place for about 1 hour or until just about doubled in size.

5.  Bake in a preheated 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) oven for about 35 to 45 minutes. Remove from oven let cool slightly then brush with glaze.

6.  To make glaze: In a small saucepan combine the 1/4 cup sugar, orange juice and orange zest. Bring to a boil over medium heat and boil for 2 minutes. Brush over top of bread while still warm. Sprinkle glazed bread with white sugar.

Footnotes

You may substitute 1/2 teaspoon anise extract for the anise seeds. 






 

Day of the Dead Cookies

 


Prep: 2 hours + chilling Bake: 10 min./batch + cooling
Makes 1 dozen

Ingredients

1-1/4 cups butter, softened
1-3/4 cups confectioners' sugar
2 ounces almond paste
1 large egg
1/4 cup 2% milk
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
4 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 packages (12 ounces each) white candy coating melts
Optional decorations: Jumbo sprinkles, peppermint candies, candy-coated sunflower kernels, Skittles, Twizzlers Rainbow Twists and Good & Plenty candies
Black paste food coloring

Directions 
 
In a large bowl, cream butter and confectioners' sugar until light and fluffy; add almond paste. Beat in the egg, milk and vanilla. Combine flour and salt; gradually add to creamed mixture and mix well. 
 
Cover and refrigerate for 1 hour.
 
On a lightly floured surface, roll out dough to 1/4-in. thickness. Cut out with a floured 5-in. skull-shaped cookie cutter. Place 1 in. apart on ungreased baking sheets.
 
Bake at 375° for 7-9 minutes or until firm. Let stand for 2 minutes before removing to wire racks to cool completely.
 
In a large, shallow microwave-safe dish, melt white candy coating melts according to package directions. Dip top side of each cookie into coating, allowing excess to drip off; place on waxed paper.
 
Add decorations as desired. Tint remaining white candy coating black; pipe on mouth. Let stand until set.

 

 

Day of the Dead (Spanish: Día de Muertos) is a Mexican holiday celebrated throughout Mexico, in particular the Central and South regions, and by people of Mexican ancestry living in other places, especially the United States. It is acknowledged internationally in many other cultures. The multi-day holiday focuses on gatherings of family and friends to pray for and remember friends and family members who have died, and help support their spiritual journey. In 2008, the tradition was inscribed in the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity by UNESCO.

The holiday is sometimes called Día de los Muertos in Anglophone countries, a back-translation of its original name, Día de Muertos. It is particularly celebrated in Mexico where the day is a public holiday. Prior to Spanish colonization in the 16th century, the celebration took place at the beginning of summer. Gradually, it was associated with October 31, November 1, and November 2 to coincide with the Western Christianity triduum of Allhallowtide: All Saints' Eve, All Saints' Day, and All Souls' Day. Traditions connected with the holiday include building private altars called ofrendas, honoring the deceased using calaveras, aztec marigolds, and the favorite foods and beverages of the departed, and visiting graves with these as gifts. Visitors also leave possessions of the deceased at the graves.

Scholars trace the origins of the modern Mexican holiday to indigenous observances dating back hundreds of years and to an Aztec festival dedicated to the goddess Mictecacihuatl. The holiday has spread throughout the world, being absorbed into other deep traditions in honor of the dead. It has become a national symbol and as such is taught (for educational purposes) in the nation's schools. Many families celebrate a traditional "All Saints' Day" associated with the Catholic Church.

Originally, the Day of the Dead as such was not celebrated in northern Mexico, where it was unknown until the 20th century because its indigenous people had different traditions. The people and the church rejected it as a day related to syncretizing pagan elements with Catholic Christianity. They held the traditional 'All Saints' Day' in the same way as other Christians in the world. There was limited Mesoamerican influence in this region, and relatively few indigenous inhabitants from the regions of Southern Mexico, where the holiday was celebrated. In the early 21st century in northern Mexico, Día de Muertos is observed because the Mexican government made it a national holiday based on educational policies from the 1960s; it has introduced this holiday as a unifying national tradition based on indigenous traditions.

The Mexican Day of the Dead celebration is similar to other societies' observances of a time to honor the dead. The Spanish tradition, for instance, includes festivals and parades, as well as gatherings of families at cemeteries to pray for their deceased loved ones at the end of the day.

Observance in Mexico 

Origins


The Day of the Dead celebrations in Mexico developed from ancient traditions among its pre-Columbian cultures. Rituals celebrating the deaths of ancestors had been observed by these civilizations perhaps for as long as 2,500–3,000 years. The festival that developed into the modern Day of the Dead fell in the ninth month of the Aztec calendar, about the beginning of August, and was celebrated for an entire month. The festivities were dedicated to the goddess known as the "Lady of the Dead", corresponding to the modern La Calavera Catrina.

By the late 20th century in most regions of Mexico, practices had developed to honor dead children and infants on November 1, and to honor deceased adults on November 2. November 1 is generally referred to as Día de los Inocentes ("Day of the Innocents") but also as Día de los Angelitos ("Day of the Little Angels"); November 2 is referred to as Día de los Muertos or Día de los Difuntos ("Day of the Dead").

Food

During Day of the Dead festivities, food is both eaten by living people and given to the spirits of their departed ancestors as ofrendas ("offerings").  Tamales are one of the most common dishes prepared for this day for both purposes.

Pan de muerto and calaveras are associated specifically with Day of the Dead. Pan de muerto is a type of sweet roll shaped like a bun, topped with sugar, and often decorated with bone-shaped phalanges pieces.. Calaveras, or sugar skulls, display colorful designs to represent the vitality and individual personality of the departed.

In addition to food, drink is also important to the tradition of Day of the Dead. Historically, the main alcoholic drink was pulque while today families will commonly drink the favorite beverage of their deceased ancestors. Other drinks associated with the holiday are atole and champurrado, warm, thick, non-alcoholic masa drinks.

Jamaica iced tea is a popular herbal tea made of the flowers and leaves of the Jamaican hibiscus plant (Hibiscus sabdariffa), known as flor de Jamaica in Mexico. It is served cold and quite sweet with a lot of ice. The ruby-red beverage is called hibiscus tea in English-speaking countries and called agua de Jamaica (water of Jamaica) in Spanish.  

Monday, October 31, 2022

Favorite Halloween Anime, Manga, Movies, TV Shows and Videogames Suggestions

Anime

Black Butler
Vampire Knight
Vampire Knight Guilty

Manga

Black Butler
Cain
Godchild
Vampire Knight

Movies

Dracula Rising (1993)
The Evil Dead (1981)
Evil Dead II (1987)
Fright Night 1 and 2 (1985 and 1987)
Howling VI: The Freaks (1991)
Jack Be Nimble (1993)
Night of the Creeps (1986)
Sometimes They Come Back Again (1996)
To Die For: Dracula: The Love Story (1989)

PC Games

Gabriel Knight 1: Sins of the Fathers
Gabriel Knight 2: The Beast Within
Gabriel Knight 3: Blood of the Sacred, Blood of the Damned
Phantasmagoria
Phantasmagoria 2: A Puzzle of Flesh
Quest for Glory: Shadows of Darkness 

TV Shows

Blood Ties

Videogames

Clock Tower Series
Fatal Frame Series
Haunting Ground
Resident Evil Series
Rule of Rose
Silent Hill Series
Obscure Series
Until Dawn
Nightcry   

Skull Deviled Eggs

 


Prep/Total Time: 25 min.
Makes 2 dozen

Ingredients

12 hard-boiled large eggs
1/4 cup mayonnaise
1/4 cup roasted sweet red pepper strips, finely chopped
2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
2 teaspoons cider vinegar
1 teaspoon paprika
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1 cup finely crushed corn chips, plus whole corn chips (optional)

Directions
 
Cut eggs lengthwise in half. Remove yolks, reserving whites. In a small bowl, mash yolks. Stir in mayonnaise, peppers, mustard, vinegar, paprika, salt and pepper until blended.
Using a small and a large straw, decorate each egg white to make a skull with eyes, a nose and a mouth. Spoon or pipe yolk mixture into egg whites. Place crushed chips in a shallow bowl. Dip each exposed yolk into chips. Refrigerate, covered, until serving. If desired, garnish plate with whole corn chips.

 

Sunday, October 30, 2022

Howling VI: The Freaks

Storyline

A drifter lands in a small town where he befriends the owner of a church and gets a job to repair the church. A few weeks later after the repairs are done, the drifter and the church owner's daughter visit a fair. The next day is the full moon and the drifter plans to leave town.

Saturday, October 29, 2022

Dracula Rising

Storyline

Witness the romance and tragedy of one man's undying passion that led him to sell his soul. In this epic horror, Vlad Dracula exchanges salvation for immortality so that he may avenge the brutal death of his true love. Now he journeys to the twentieth century to lay claim to the woman he so desperately loves.

Friday, October 28, 2022

Black Mirror III

Storyline

Darren alias Adrian is now possessed by the spirit of evil Mordred, so he teams up with a renegade female priest to try and find a way to exorcise and destroy Mordred and save himself.

Thursday, October 27, 2022

Black Mirror 2

Storyline

Darren Michael's search for his missing friend takes him on a chilling expedition from his small New England town to Willow Creek in England - and the reigning evil of Black Mirror Castle.
Related Posts with Thumbnails